Bruised body and dented confidence

Skib

Well-Known Member
Dec 21, 2003
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Falling off twice in school lessons is more regular than in the various schools i have used.
it would be nice to post on NR as in the old days without continual reprimands and reproval from carthorse.
I left NR for a long time because of Carthorse, returned recently as am back riding again. And Wally was back. But wrong decision.
The number of people here with MH problems makes life a bit tricky.
 

carthorse

Super Moderator
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Jan 6, 2006
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And yet more assumptions Skib if you if you're implying I have mental health problems :rolleyes:. Or do you class mental health problems as anyone who disagrees with you or calls you out when you make sweeping assumptions? To be honest I think that's very belittling to people who have genuine mental health problems and fight hard to carry on with a normal life, or at least one that looks normal to others. Maybe you should think how things look before you post?

If you read the original post it says that the first fall was when the horse slipped & fell on mud out hacking, that can happen to any horse & any rider & JayneW herself said she didn't class it as a proper fall. And in your own post you said you fell off regularly learning to hack. So one non-hacking fall and you call it falling off regularly and question the suitability of school & instructor? That seems harsh & I think pretty soon every riding school in the country would be out of business because the truth is if you get on you will, at some point, fall off simply because sh1t happens.
 
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newforest

Bring Out the Baileys
Mar 15, 2008
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Gosh.
I think if someone named me as the reason they left the forum and then it almost reads as they are implying I have mh issues I would be reporting that post!

Personal issues between members are for pm and admin. Fwiw @Skib, this isn't the first time you have named a poster. Previously you accused a member of damaging their horse by publicly naming them on a thread.

As for falling off my first fall was waiting to canter along a track and the pony put it's head down to eat and I slid over the head. Lesson learnt, release the rein and use your leg.
 
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newforest

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I don't know if falling off gets better with experience, I sort of hope it's less.
I fell off this year when my little minx decided to have a roll in the grass. We were only walking! She's spun me off in walk as well. I think those register as non falls and you feel a right nit wit!!

What would be going through my mind, can you ask the school to teach walk to canter? The amount of bouncing a rider does trying to sit the trot which is active, steer the horse and apply the aids to a horse that simply trots faster must be hard for both parties. My RI teaches this and tries to get the pupils canter to walk. I can't do that mine just stops dead!
 

joosie

lifelong sufferer of restless brain syndrome
Oct 28, 2004
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I often fell off two or three times a ride when I was learning... it's how I learned to stay on :D
 

Kite_Rider

Cantering cabbage!
May 18, 2009
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Falling off twice in school lessons is more regular than in the various schools i have used.
it would be nice to post on NR as in the old days without continual reprimands and reproval from carthorse.
I left NR for a long time because of Carthorse, returned recently as am back riding again. And Wally was back. But wrong decision.
The number of people here with MH problems makes life a bit tricky.
I am completely baffled by this Skib?
I have on quite a few occasions been surprised and shocked by your comments on here especially directed at specific people, as for your last sentence, I am actually at a loss for words to describe how that makes me feel, you have clearly never been directly involved with someone who has MH issues or you would never have been so blasé.
May I suggest you stop and think what you have typed before you hit 'post reply' either that or just don't post at all.
I have been back and re read every post here and not once did anyone mention falling off regularly, nor did carthorse say anything that could be construed as being a reprimand or reproval to you or anyone else.
 

Emi

New Member
Mar 21, 2019
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@JayneW
It's kind of funny how I would actually offer the exact opposite advice after a fall. It's amazing that you could find the courage to get back on especially since those were your first several classes. I personally work on some exercise from the ground to calm my horse down as it is a bit of a shock for him to suddenly have me under him. and its a good chance for both of us to calm down. many times lateral movements like leg yields and sholder in are great things to get them thinking again and it's actually easier to help them correct it. As for transitions, I would say do a repeated walk to trot, 4-second intervals in each gate, then as you feel more secure and the horse listens to your leg you can start picking random timings like; 12 seconds trot 3 seconds walk and so on to mix it up. It's fun practice and the improvement is easy to see and feel. I'll give you a bit of a heads up for some behaviour that you might encounter in your journey with horses. Some horses when you lean even the littlest bit forward or back in any gate or transition will stop. Good luck and have fun.
 
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carthorse

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@newforest I'm not reporting it because I'm not seriously offended by it (apart from the insult to members with genuine mental health issues) & it's not like I have a professional reputation to be damaged. As I read it the only person it reflects badly on is Skib & I'm not reporting her post to protect her reputation lol. In fact the more people that see it & her views the better, if I'd been quicker thinking I'd have quoted it when I replied so if she does change it there's a copy of the unedited version.
 

Bodshi

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Apr 23, 2009
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I often fell off two or three times a ride when I was learning... it's how I learned to stay on :D
I'm pretty sure falling off on purpose was taught when I was a child. We used to have to do exercises that made you fall off - touch your pony's ... mane ... tail ... etc, until it got to something like fetlock, which is when we all tumbled to the ground. We did 'round the world' when the ponies were trotting round - none of this instructor holding the pony whilst the child does the movements malarkey. Falling off and getting back on was a normal part of the lesson. Health and Safety has changed all that of course.
 

newforest

Bring Out the Baileys
Mar 15, 2008
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I'm pretty sure falling off on purpose was taught when I was a child. We used to have to do exercises that made you fall off - touch your pony's ... mane ... tail ... etc, until it got to something like fetlock, which is when we all tumbled to the ground. We did 'round the world' when the ponies were trotting round - none of this instructor holding the pony whilst the child does the movements malarkey. Falling off and getting back on was a normal part of the lesson. Health and Safety has changed all that of course.
When I backed mine I pretended to fall off from walk and trot. It was going to happen sometime and I just wanted to see what she did which was stop. I got back on and carried on.
She still stops bless her if I plop.
 

Lisa&Mo

New Member
Apr 24, 2019
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Hi LisaMo,
The advice given to me on this forum was what I needed to hear. However, it did take me quite a while to feel totally relaxed when transitioning from trot to canter - I would unconsciously grab the reins and lean forward expecting it to be an awful experience which it actually never was!
I also had more lessons on the lunge and without stirrups and even rode without a saddle so knew myself that my balance was OK. This really helped with my confidence.
Ultimately I am beginning to understand that the connection between the horse and the rider’s seat and hands is so finely tuned that if you’re not relaxed the horse won’t be either. Easier said than done I know but I keep that in mind whenever I feel myself tensing up.
There is enough distance between that fall and today that I can look back and understand the errors I made which led to that happening. Having that knowledge is half the battle but I know I will never stop learning. I’ve had a positive lesson today and continue to enjoy riding. I know I will probably fall off again but it hopefully won’t be because I made the same mistake. You will be ok.
Thank you, I rode her again today, she was rushing a bit but having read your post it is probably because she can feel my nerves... spent about an hour walking and trotting and practicing direction... gonna take small steps and build both of our confidence safely. I have a lesson tomorrow and am going to ask her to do some no stirrupss work on the lung line, wish me luck
 

JayneW

Member
Dec 3, 2017
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Thank you to those who have offered further views on this thread and added their own experiences. It appears that falling off is something several of us have experienced and we’re all still riding.
I don’t agree with the view that a fall is necessarily the fault of the RI or RS. I am of the opinion that I am choosing to learn a new skill and that will bring challenges. As an adult learner it is up to me whether I continue to challenge myself and accept the obvious risks or stay at the level I have reached. Ultimately the decision is mine. I’ll never be a great rider but I will get better because of the good and not so good experiences that happen on the way.
 

newforest

Bring Out the Baileys
Mar 15, 2008
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Professional jockeys see falling off as part of the job.

It's just gravity really. If you are on something that moves and you stop moving with it, you will probably move away from it.

They are big animals and we are tiny little blots in the landscape in comparison
 

Trewsers

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Oct 13, 2004
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I don't know if falling off gets better with experience, I sort of hope it's less.
I fell off this year when my little minx decided to have a roll in the grass. We were only walking! She's spun me off in walk as well. I think those register as non falls and you feel a right nit wit!!

What would be going through my mind, can you ask the school to teach walk to canter? The amount of bouncing a rider does trying to sit the trot which is active, steer the horse and apply the aids to a horse that simply trots faster must be hard for both parties. My RI teaches this and tries to get the pupils canter to walk. I can't do that mine just stops dead!
Hahahahah nit wit! lol love that expression. That describes the last fall I had from Storm - we were "jumping" (using that term very loosely!!!) and she must have sensed my hesitancy. And I slithered. Off. Feeling very silly................
 

fourlegs

Horse addict
I am probably older than most of you and I fall off from time to time - especially when Scully has one of her "moments" ;)

Falls have ranged from falling off while mounting to falling off at full gallop from an 18 hand clydesdale .....

I think that riding schools generally do not teach two important things - how to fall and how to do a one rein stop.

If you can, try and roll rather than land flat - never put an arm out to save yourself on landing, that's how wrists get broken and if you have big troubles, use small circles - using one rein to haul the horse's head round will disengage its hind quarters and often result in regaining control.
 

newforest

Bring Out the Baileys
Mar 15, 2008
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I am probably older than most of you and I fall off from time to time - especially when Scully has one of her "moments" ;)

Falls have ranged from falling off while mounting to falling off at full gallop from an 18 hand clydesdale .....

I think that riding schools generally do not teach two important things - how to fall and how to do a one rein stop.

If you can, try and roll rather than land flat - never put an arm out to save yourself on landing, that's how wrists get broken and if you have big troubles, use small circles - using one rein to haul the horse's head round will disengage its hind quarters and often result in regaining control.
Mine knitted the one rein stop and I've used it with success on more than one occasion.
It was a western lesson that taught me that though.
 

sillygirlfun

New Member
Jun 6, 2019
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I have been riding since August and absolutely love it. However in the last three weeks I have fallen off twice. The first was when the horse I was riding slipped and fell in the mud out on a hack ( I don't really count this as a proper fall) but this week I fell off when practising trot to canter transitions. I lost my stirrups, the horse coughed causing me to be even more unbalanced and grip tighter - the horse went faster because I was gripping etc etc and I flew into the fence at speed and am very bruised and sore. I am disappointed in myself that in the heat of the moment I didn't even think about pulling on the reins to try and slow the horse. My young daughter was watching so I had to get up and carry on as if I was ok when in truth I was petrified to get back on.
I understand that riding does carry physical risks and I was very grateful for the protective clothing I was wearing but I worry that my psychological fear will transmit to the next horse I ride. Any tips from those much more experienced in the art of riding in 'just getting back on?'
 

sillygirlfun

New Member
Jun 6, 2019
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I just turned 56 years old. I used to be a horse wrangler and then I traveled around the United States working with animals and ended up settling down in Florida where I plan to stay. I have not ridden horses in years, and the last time I did was just a walk being led on a Peruvian at the Medieval Faire and I had a very hard time dismounting even with a stairway deck. I believe with my injuries and health weaknesses that both of us can manage it if we get ourselves stronger. Here is what I suggest. Physical Therapy along with Aquatic Therapy(Which really feels good) they use warm water, and what exercise you can manage to loosen up your muscles which will help you balance, get stronger, more flexible and have a better ride. I know exactly how you feel. Try doing that because when we get older especially with health problems and disabilities, it makes it more likely to get injured. Even though we were once very good riders, or if you are new(It doesn't matter) our mind may say we can but our bodies say yeah right? So it is wise to pick a horse that is husband, kid safe and goes slow until we get used to that, and then go a little faster when we get confidence as our body starts to get used to it, and move on from there. You were right to get back on, but see if you cannot get something to ride for a slow trail ride and one you can do on a slow horse at first so you can enjoy your ride without fear.
 

Huggy

Well-Known Member
Nov 11, 2018
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I just turned 56 years old. I used to be a horse wrangler and then I traveled around the United States working with animals and ended up settling down in Florida where I plan to stay. I have not ridden horses in years, and the last time I did was just a walk being led on a Peruvian at the Medieval Faire and I had a very hard time dismounting even with a stairway deck. I believe with my injuries and health weaknesses that both of us can manage it if we get ourselves stronger. Here is what I suggest. Physical Therapy along with Aquatic Therapy(Which really feels good) they use warm water, and what exercise you can manage to loosen up your muscles which will help you balance, get stronger, more flexible and have a better ride. I know exactly how you feel. Try doing that because when we get older especially with health problems and disabilities, it makes it more likely to get injured. Even though we were once very good riders, or if you are new(It doesn't matter) our mind may say we can but our bodies say yeah right? So it is wise to pick a horse that is husband, kid safe and goes slow until we get used to that, and then go a little faster when we get confidence as our body starts to get used to it, and move on from there. You were right to get back on, but see if you cannot get something to ride for a slow trail ride and one you can do on a slow horse at first so you can enjoy your ride without fear.
Haven't got anything to add, just welcome to NR! Jealous of you living in Florida - if you ever want a bit of drizzly rain, biting winds, I'll happily swap with you :p
 

Toz

Active Member
Jul 14, 2019
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I’m not sure if this really works or has a kind of placebo effect but try a drop of rescue remedy before you ride?
I used to give some to my daughter before she went into competitions. She had had a really awful jumping session and scared herself and her horse. It really did seem to help.
 
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