First horse 😱

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Hhh

New Member
May 22, 2020
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Hi everyone.
I am new to anything like this so hope someone can see it πŸ˜… I have been riding since young had a big break when I had my children. For the last nearly two years I have had a lovely cob in loan. Anyway I am always looking for my own. And last week I bought a 2 year old cob to try bond with and bring on my self. He is lovely but is not very settled at the min. And I am feeling a little overwhelmed πŸ™ƒ just wondered if anyone had any advice on owning 2 year olds. He didnt come from the best home. But he is a lovely boy. Is happy to be lead around on Headcoller, groomed (even though can be figity) and pick feet up. I have 3 children also.
Any advice welcome xx
 

chunky monkey

Well-Known Member
May 2, 2007
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Hi and welcome to the forum.

Ive got no experience myself of youngsters but i know a few people on here have and a couple of members currently have young ones they are bringing on. Im sure they will be able to advise you.
 
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carthorse

Super Moderator
Staff member
Jan 6, 2006
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Hi and welcome.

A two year old is young - obviously! - and at the moment he's probably unsettled from moving home and being with new people and horses. If he's behaving to lead and groom under those circumstances with someone not used to youngsters he's doing well and someone has clearly already put some decent work into him for it to be holding in a different environment.

I wouldn't rush to do more than he's doing at the moment, and keep sessions short so he doesn't get bored and misbehave as a result. Youngsters can sometimes seem to have a similar attention span to a goldfish lol. If you run into problems get experienced help straight away, it's far better to sort them early than to let them become established and more difficult to sort out.

If you want to do things like going out for walks and in hand showing then it's all useful experience, but make sure you do the homework first so you stay safe and in control, and don't overdo it.
 

Huggy

Well-Known Member
Nov 11, 2018
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Hello, and welcome. I'm not experienced with anything that young, but would think, as everyone says, take it slowly, and lots and lots of handling. Any first horse is overwhelming, so youre not alone in that! Enjoy, and please post a few pics.
 
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Hhh

New Member
May 22, 2020
11
8
3
Hi thankyou for all your replys !😘I have just been getting him out once a day to give him a feed and a quick brush. He is a lovely boy. And is obviously just getting used to his new surroundings. The problem I am having is that he has always lived alone.(I feel the previous owner hasn't been entirely truthful why hes always lived alone as she had many horses!).I have put him in with other horses and he is getting used to it. But I am finding he is getting bullied a bit in field and has jumped a couple of fences !! Thinking of putting him in his own paddock next to the horses ? I also have children and feel the yard and field isnt what I expected ! So our own paddock would mean its safer for him and us all ? X
 

Huggy

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Nov 11, 2018
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Definitely put him in a field over the fence to other horses. I've only ever once seen a horse put in with others straight away, and it was bedlam, with a couple of nasty injuries. Give him a week over the fence, then try. They have their pecking order, and he may get pushed around, but it shouldn't be so frantic. He's best in company, so even if he has to stay in a paddock next to the others, it's better than being alone.
 
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carthorse

Super Moderator
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Jan 6, 2006
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On his own for maybe a week, though if he was mine I'd leave him in there since he's already out with them, but after that get him in a herd. Mentally it's better for him to be with others, and what you see as bullying is probably just him finding his place in the herd and it may be harder for him if he's always been kept on his own and doesn't have many social skills. If you do decide to move him into the next field I'd ask if you can move a fairly low ranking horse with him so he has a friend to pal up with and will hopefully find it easier when he goes back in.

I don't know how old your children are, but generally yards aren't the right place for unsupervised children or very young ones. I do feel it's wrong to keep your youngster on his own and deprive him of the chance to learn social skills just because it's easier for you and your children - you think he's struggling now but a herd would be far harder on an adult horse with no herd skills. Either tell your children to stay outside the field while you catch or sit them in the car if they're too young to do that. Young children are safest kept out of a field of horses and older ones can be taught the skills to keep themselves as safe as an adult would be.
 
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Hhh

New Member
May 22, 2020
11
8
3
Thankyou. My husband is going up today to sort other paddock for him. Do feel bad that I have introduced him and then taking him away but feel that field is making him anxious it certainly is me. He will be surrounded by horses around his paddock some have there own paddocks next to him and hes next to big field so should be ok. Going to have to put electric up as its next to farmers field and road and I have discovered he can jump fences. Just want him happy and settled. And also to feel safe. I have children who sometimes come with me so they will be able to get to bond with him safely too. Xx
 
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Hhh

New Member
May 22, 2020
11
8
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On his own for maybe a week, though if he was mine I'd leave him in there since he's already out with them, but after that get him in a herd. Mentally it's better for him to be with others, and what you see as bullying is probably just him finding his place in the herd and it may be harder for him if he's always been kept on his own and doesn't have many social skills. If you do decide to move him into the next field I'd ask if you can move a fairly low ranking horse with him so he has a friend to pal up with and will hopefully find it easier when he goes back in.

I don't know how old your children are, but generally yards aren't the right place for unsupervised children or very young ones. I do feel it's wrong to keep your youngster on his own and deprive him of the chance to learn social skills just because it's easier for you and your children - you think he's struggling now but a herd would be far harder on an adult horse with no herd skills. Either tell your children to stay outside the field while you catch or sit them in the car if they're too young to do that. Young children are safest kept out of a field of horses and older ones can be taught the skills to keep themselves as safe as an adult would be.
 

Hhh

New Member
May 22, 2020
11
8
3
Yes I do understand what your saying. I am going to speak to the yard owner today about putting another with him. My children are 12, 9 and 5 and I never leave them unsupervised I am always teaching them about safety around horses. Thankyou for your advice. I do appreciate it x
 

chunky monkey

Well-Known Member
May 2, 2007
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Whilst i had no experience of youngsters when i introduced my two boys one was 20 the other was 4. They were put in the same field with an electric tape between them. They learned to mutual groom over the fence together.
When i actually put them in together i brought them onto a fresh peice of grass that they could choose to put there heads down on or go say hello. Each day i extended the time they were introduced to one another. Whilst i appreciate this may not be possible in a yard situation. I would certainly see if you can fence him in the same field where he can learn to groom over the fence with others. I personally dont see this as a issue if it takes a month to learn to be social over the fence. In that time use that time and space for you to also obtain a bond and establish groundwork and boundaries.
 

Hhh

New Member
May 22, 2020
11
8
3
Thankyou for much ! This is exactly what I am doing so you have made me feel so much better. His paddock is part of the field so they can groom over fence and see each other. I know how important it is not to totally isolate them away. It's one really big field and some horses are together (that's where he is now) then bits are sectioned off for some horses. They can all reach each other. Were they ok grooming over electric fencing ? Going to do the fence on the inside lower so they can reach each other . X
 

Trewsers

Well-Known Member
Oct 13, 2004
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Hello and welcome :D I have no experience of youngsters - only oldies! But I'm sure there's been already some good advice offered up - hope you post more on your progress.
 
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chunky monkey

Well-Known Member
May 2, 2007
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Were they ok grooming over electric fencing ? Going to do the fence on the inside lower so they can reach each other . X
I just used the normal 3ft electric fence poly posts with tape. Fence was tight both ends so couldnt whip around in the wind. They were quite happy leant over nibbling necks. Mine are 14.1hh and 14.3hh cobs.
 
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Hhh

New Member
May 22, 2020
11
8
3
Thankyou that's what we are going to use I think too. I love cobs πŸ’™ He is a 13hh cob he is only 2 and a half so hoping he gets to about 14hh for me to ride xx
 
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Huggy

Well-Known Member
Nov 11, 2018
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Thankyou that's what we are going to use I think too. I love cobs πŸ’™ He is a 13hh cob he is only 2 and a half so hoping he gets to about 14hh for me to ride xx
My most recent one is a 13hh cob - I'm new to cobs - it's an experience! (A good one :D )
 

Hhh

New Member
May 22, 2020
11
8
3
Oh have you you. How old is he ? I keep thinking I am a bit crazy taking on a young horse. But it's so hard when looking for a horse as so many people are not honest. Just thought I can teach him ground mannors myself and bring him on around me and the kids. Saying that the old owner has definitly not been honest about some things about him ! But we love him already πŸ’™x
 
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newforest

Somewhere in the solar system
Mar 15, 2008
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Thankyou that's what we are going to use I think too. I love cobs πŸ’™ He is a 13hh cob he is only 2 and a half so hoping he gets to about 14hh for me to ride xx
Mine was a solid chunk when I got her and already big enough. But grow she sure did.
 

Huggy

Well-Known Member
Nov 11, 2018
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Oh have you you. How old is he ? I keep thinking I am a bit crazy taking on a young horse. But it's so hard when looking for a horse as so many people are not honest. Just thought I can teach him ground mannors myself and bring him on around me and the kids. Saying that the old owner has definitly not been honest about some things about him ! But we love him already πŸ’™x
He's 14 and I've had him 2 years. I got my first, a New Forest, when he was just rising 4, so not quite such a baby as yours. Had him 26 years, and he was a joy - having a youngster meant a strong bond. My cob, Hogan, is an education! He's the complete opposite in every way, but I love him to bits, and he's such fun. Do get some pics up of yours!20200511_171404.jpg
 
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