Not so stupid questions?

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Has anyone got a question that is really bothering them but don't want to ask it incase people think you're an idiot?
I have.
What does cold backed mean?
 

Wally

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Apr 16, 2000
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Cold backed means that the horse can react violently when the saddle is first put on. Sometimes you have to put the saddle on and leave it for about 20 minutes before the horse will allow you to mount. Some cold backed horses will buck like stink, some will just pull faces.

Folk will have spent 100's of punds in specialists trying to find a reason and the vets and chiropractors can, sometimes, find no cause.

With sold backed horses you just have to take things slowly and sometimes lunge them with the saddle before riding.
 

Peanut

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Aug 1, 2005
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When someone says that a horse's back has come up, is that the same thing?
 

Wally

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If a horse gives you the feeling that his back has come up it might mean 2 things,

it might mean that he is about to buck, or it might mean that he has just engaged his hind end and is working through from behind.
 

hApPiNeSs

& Sharman :)
Jun 28, 2004
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ok then, how do you pronounce

andulusian
hanoverian
chincoteague
equine :eek: :eek: :eek: (sorry... theres two ways...)
equitation
 

Peace

pAin't Nobody's Bidness
Nov 12, 1999
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We may pronounce things a little differently over here:) , but I'd say:

Ann-duh-loo-zhun, stress on the -loo part;

Han (short a sound) O (long o) ver (as in very) ee un (stress the ver syllable);

shin - cuh- teeg (hard g as in girl) stress first syllable

equine I pronounce with a short e but I've heard it pronounced with a long one as well, as eh-kwine
 
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Jessey

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Dec 20, 2004
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If I remember rightly the acctual definition of navicular is pain which is focused around the navicula bone in the foot, so it may have nothing to do with the navicula bone its self and the acctual pain source may never be identified :( So although often called a disease it is really a syndrome, as it is no specific thing but just a compelation of symptoms.

J x
 

domane

Gracie's mum
Jul 31, 2005
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Oh fabbo.... what is "leg yielding"?

And can anyone explain a "half-halt".... I get the feeling that this one is as easy to understand as "the offside-rule" :eek: . I understand the theory, but I haven't a clue how to "do" it!!! :rolleyes: (I have a friend whom I email loads of questions to but even SHE gave up on the half-halt and said you have to see it to understand!!! :( )
 

RustyMary

Spice is nice!
Oct 26, 2005
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Thanks for the thread idea First Time Mum!

My question is just for interest as I'm a million years away from buying a horse. However I'm wondering about insurance - are your horses insured, and if so, what for? Vet bills? Theft? Death? Reading on this forum it seems that horses are such fragile creatures - if you spent £6000 or something like that and it died the next week from colic or a freak accident or because it couldn't get up, would you be able to reclaim any money from insurance?

Thanks NR forum - I can't ride at the moment as my RI is about to have a baby and I've only had 6 lessons, and I would be going crazy if I couldn't at least read about horses (and I've learned so much on here) and look at the pictures :D
 

Colorado Sunset

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*coughs embarrasdly* Theres been loads of threads of this an i can never figure out what a rig is! ... care to elighten me :eek:

Leg yielding is when the horse moves forwards and sideways at the same time, on a diagonal line. So they face forwards and yet move diagonally. There is also a slight bend to the outside. I think someone asked this on another thread, have a search as I seem to remember a video was put up which might help :)

Jo
 

angelfben

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A rig is a male horse that has either one or both testes undescended and retained, ie retained in the abdomen. This means that normal castration won't be effective and rigs are often found as 'geldings' with stallion like tendencies and sometimes the ability to reproduce.

To fully castrate a rig requires an operation to remove the retained testicle.
 
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angelfben

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INSURANCE

I have both my horses insured. Predominantly because of the risk of vets bills which can easily get into their thousands and in this case insurance is essential as you can imagine! Also for 3rd party, so that for example if one of ny horses escapes onto the road and causes a traffic accident, my insurance company will cover me for legal fee's, compensation for others involved etc. There are lots of options for what you can insure against, theft or straying, vets bills to a certain amount (e.g. the 'standard' is often up to £10k but some people prefer to pay a higher monthly premium to insure up to £20 or even £50k), disposal in the event of death, you can also insure against loss of use, where if your horse in injured and no longer suitable for what you bought him for the insurance company will pay you a sum towards buying a new horse. The amount you get for all these things in the case of a claim is dependant on the value you insure your horse up to, which again effects how much you pay each month - the higher the value of your horse the more you pay each month.

For more details the Petplan website is very informative :)
 

amandal

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Feb 12, 2004
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hApPiNeSs said:
ok then, how do you pronounce

andulusian
hanoverian
chincoteague
equine :eek: :eek: :eek: (sorry... theres two ways...)
equitation
I'd pronounce andalucian - anda - luth - ian, but what on earth is chincoteague - never heard of that one :eek: ?
 

Imp

Megan's mummy :-D
Sep 6, 2005
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Ok, brilliant thread! Here's my silly question - I'm assuming there will be no recourse to retribution or ridicule outside of this thread ;) .

When I was a kid the horses in my family ate grass and hay (occasionally some grain in winter). What's haylage please, everybody else seems to know? (G*d I feel daft asking that :eek: :eek: :eek: )
 

RustyMary

Spice is nice!
Oct 26, 2005
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Two of my favourite books as a child were 'Misty of Chincoteague' and 'Stormy, Misty's foal' - I just loved the names :)
 

Montana

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Feb 22, 2005
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Haylage is hay which is cut, and instead of being left out, turned regularly, dried, then baled like hay, is cut, and immediately baled. It gets wrapped in layers of plastic, so it doesn't dry out, and more of the nutrition from the grass is kept.:D