Not so stupid questions?

Pink's lady

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LaurenC said:
What happens if you feed two types of chaff? Like I don't know a mollased one and one with alfa a?
They explode;) :D ............................not much really. Each chaff type has different nutritional values so mixing them gives you a blend of values. Bit like mixing different types of hard-feed. Mollassesed chaff tends to be cheap, poor quality chaff, so mixing it with Alfa-A (a high protien, higher energy, better quality chaff) just dilutes the alfa-a. Make sit taste nicer though.

k8schmutz said:
how would you stop a horse from forging?
Make sure their hind toes aren't too long, put over reach-boots on and get them fit. Most forging horses do so when tired - they aren't quick enough in lifting their front feet. Or going barefoot solves the problem entirely;)
 

chickflick1066

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Great thread

How do you measure for a dressage girth?

How long should you leave before riding after a feed?

Whats the proper way to cool a horse down? And also - should you use a net cooler or a fleece cooler?
 

Pink's lady

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chickflick1066 said:
How do you measure for a dressage girth?
From roller of buckle to roller of buckle. I've just measured my old dressage girth and it'a exactly the 26inchs from buckle to buckle that it's meant to be


How long should you leave before riding after a feed?
Meant to be an hour, but you'd get away with 45mins. Depends how much of a 'feed' they get though and how much work they're going to be doing- a proper meal would be an hour, but a token feed (i.e a handful of chaff), just 15mins or so.
 

chickflick1066

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Pink's lady said:
From roller of buckle to roller of buckle. I've just measured my old dressage girth and it'a exactly the 26inchs from buckle to buckle that it's meant to be
LOL, I meant how do you work out what size dressage girth to get if you've only got a normal girth.:eek:
 

k8schmutz

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Pink's lady said:
Make sure their hind toes aren't too long, put over reach-boots on and get them fit. Most forging horses do so when tired - they aren't quick enough in lifting their front feet. Or going barefoot solves the problem entirely;)
You'd think that wouldn't you, but Lulu has to be awkward :rolleyes: She has over reach boots, is barefoot at the back and forges at anytime during the ride not just when she's tired :eek:
 

Pink's lady

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chickflick1066 said:
LOL, I meant how do you work out what size dressage girth to get if you've only got a normal girth.:eek:
huh? you mean if you have a new dressage saddle and you need a girth? Trial and error I'm afraid. Or pinching someone elses girth. You can just guess though. I had to guess Pinks and got a 26, which was perfect. She's normally in a 54 normal girth
 

Pink's lady

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Now I have a question for the dressage/leather people.

Just got my (lovely, I'm in love:D it's just so soft and smells so lovely:D ) new shaped dressage girth for Pink. It's stunning but has two funny buckles on it that I'm not sure what they're for -




I thought maybe they might be for an over-girth for XC, but why would they be on a 28inch dressage girth? :confused: And they're really little.

Anyway, if they're not essential, which they don't look, I'm going to (VERY carefully:eek: ) cut them off cos they just jingle about:rolleyes:
 

fiesty_filly

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Pink's lady said:
Anyway, if they're not essential, which they don't look, I'm going to (VERY carefully:eek: ) cut them off cos they just jingle about:rolleyes:
I don't really know what they are for but it's just the jingling that bothers you maybe you should just tape them down until you find out what they are for, it looks like a nice expensive girth and it would really suck if someday you actually needed those buckles. You could probably use a little piece of black electrical tape and it wouldn't even be noticeable.
 

elise

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Pink's lady said:
Now I have a question for the dressage/leather people.

I thought maybe they might be for an over-girth for XC, but why would they be on a 28inch dressage girth? :confused: And they're really little.
We have a dressage saddle at one of my barns that has an extra strap that buckles right onto that extra buckle you have on your girth. I think you are right that it's for an overgirth, assuming that's what it's called in dressage as well. The strap on the dressage saddle is actually connected to the flap instead of under the flap like the regular billets.
 

L34NN3

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Bit - I'm sure there's some sort of formula (that i don't know about) maybe like you can get pony/cob/full headcollars...

Chaff - is a low energy feed. It's the rubbishy bit (separating the wheat from the chaff) really and is mainly fibre with little energy. it's good for good-doers...

Good doer - A horse or pony that puts weight on really easily like natives. They need little or no hard feed. Usually just a handful of chaff to allow vitamins to be given.

That girth can be used with a close contact eventing saddle - they fasten the same way. I guess then you would use an overgirth. I've used the extra buckles to attach a bungee...
 

LindaAd

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Laurenc said:
Neddie isn't that another world for a horse?

Neddie is a word for a donkey, so when you call your horses neds you're really calling them donkeys, in a friendly sort of way ...

Two roads near us are called Eddy Green Lane and Jenny's lane - that's where they used to graze the male and the female donkeys ....

Linda
 

LindaAd

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Bay Mare said:
In theory they're not the same but do tend to be used interchangeably.

CHAFF is the 'hairy' bit at the end of the wheat (the grain husks) which is why you get the saying "sorting the wheat from the chaff" (the chaff being the bit that is wasted).
Yes, but the word "chaff" is also used for the anything that isn't the grain - so, in the case of horses, it's the stalks. Chop is chaff that's been chopped up so the horses can eat it - they used to have a chaff-cutter, with a wheel with a handle to turn a circular blade, in every stable.

What a brilliant idea for a thread this is!

Linda
 

horsecrazychick

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Yay I like this thread. ^^

What are the names of all the gaits of gaited horses?
Can gaited horses jump(while doing one of their funny gaits)?
How high can a mule jump? or a donkey?
Can zebras be entered in horse shows?
Is there a reason why most horses' manes are on the right side?
Is it true that all grey horses are more prone to sun burn/skin diseases(even though their skin is black)?

lol odd questions I know...
 

mad mare1

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Not a clue on that one I'm afraid, now here is a daft question, why do you have to have stirrups up round your ears for jumping, but when doing dressage, they gotta be so long that you can only just reach the damn things????? I ride with one stirrup length, and that is it!!!! Can't be bothered with all the altering stuff!!!!!
 

fiesty_filly

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horsecrazychick said:
Yay I like this thread. ^^

Can zebras be entered in horse shows?
Is there a reason why most horses' manes are on the right side?
Is it true that all grey horses are more prone to sun burn/skin diseases(even though their skin is black)?

lol odd questions I know...
Zebras arent really horses but I'm sure that if you entered one no-one would argue... I have heard that zebras are extremely hard to domesticate which would make showing and training very difficult.

Horses manes go naturally to one side or the other, depending on the horse. Most english shows deem it 'proper' that manes are on the right, that is the way braids are to be done. So a lot of horses have their manes trained to the right from early in life

Mad mare1- Stirrup length
When doing dressage it is helpful to have long stirrups to allow maximum contact with the horse allowing you to communicate more effectively, it is also easier to sit deep in the saddle with longer stirrups. For jumping having short stirrups lets you get the proper balence over fences, it is not as important over low fences but when the jumps start to get higher you notice a HUGE difference if your stirrups are too low.

Gray horses are more prone to melanoma (skin cancer) than other horses.