Trying to find his lordship a new home isnt easy!

lauren123

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Feb 3, 2007
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#1
No. Before anyone says anything. How lordship isnt being sold. He never will be! Eventhough there is times i seriously think about it,But then i would hsve to Pay someone to take him off me :D

This yard hunting marlarka isnt going great.
Obviously the 3 yards i mentioned where isnt not suitable or full.
Went to see one today:
Its 8.6 miles away.
It is a lovely set up. Brand new big stable for sox,floodlit. Place to tie horses up for farrier and hose pipe near by. 2 schools. Both floodlit. Hacking is amazing. Woodland all over. YO seems very nice. Very social yard. They compete alot and Yo will transport to shows (lorry or trailer) they all support each other so if someone is competing a few go to support.
Turnout. They go out 3 days per week and a hour on a saturday if you wish. Individual turnout. Can do extras if needed.
However sox would have to wear a collar whenever he is stabled.
I would be on part livery due to shifts. So 3 days full livery the rest diy. They would provide the straw but not hay. Would be paying more for adlib. On that arrangement its roughly around £275 per month. Before hay and feed etc.
I guess my issue is he cant crib at all. I are how cribbing however annoying as a way of coping. And i know from personal experiences if I was prevented from coping in a certain way no matter how unhealthy.. I would find something else.
Also its a bit pricey. It works out about 66 per week. Which for part around here is at the top end. Part livery is normal 45-60.
But then i also feel how choosy can i be? I will need to find somewhere for him. Even if its temp
 

Trewsers

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Oct 13, 2004
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#2
I know how much you want to move, but I just don't like the idea of him being made to wear a crib collar. Surely his frustration at being prevented will only make him do something else? Appreciate the YO doesn't want damage or other liveries "copyin" him, but my feeling is just that he won't be happy and it may lead to other issues. What is your feeling really on the collar? I am only giving my opinion here - and of course I know not everyone has the same one. And I do know how hard it is finding a good place for him. Sorry, not very helpful, please don't think I am being negative either - I just worry it won't be right.
 

Mary Poppins

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Oct 10, 2004
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#3
The turnout would put me off, it is far too restricted for me. I would keep it in mind but keep on looking.

I don't know much about cribbing, is it possible to put something over the stable door that he could crib on but would protect the door? A door protector or similar?
 

carthorse

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Jan 6, 2006
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#4
You did say that when he was on ulcer meds from the vet his cribbing reduced dramatically, that being the case it seems to me that it's more a stomach issue than an established habit that he does regardless. Maybe the solution is to get the stomach issue sorted so he doesn't feel the need to crib as much?

At this point in time I can't help thinking that moving has to be a priority, and if that means considering a collar for a while then maybe that's something you have to accept. I would ask a yard if they'd allow you to fit a weaving grill on his door so he didn't have a surface to grip on to crib since I'd prefer that to a collar, but on the understanding that if it didn't work you would use one. And sort the gut, then he won't feel the need to crib.

I wonder if the set up you describe in this yard may suit him better? Yes turnout is restricted, but it sounds like there will always be plenty of horses in & that could be reassuring to him as it would be more like his routine back when he was in racing. I know lots of turnout is always seen as ideal, but some horses have been brought up differently from such an early age that they are almost institutionalised & feel safer being in more.
 

lauren123

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Feb 3, 2007
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#6
I know how much you want to move, but I just don't like the idea of him being made to wear a crib collar. Surely his frustration at being prevented will only make him do something else? Appreciate the YO doesn't want damage or other liveries "copyin" him, but my feeling is just that he won't be happy and it may lead to other issues. What is your feeling really on the collar? I am only giving my opinion here - and of course I know not everyone has the same one. And I do know how hard it is finding a good place for him. Sorry, not very helpful, please don't think I am being negative either - I just worry it won't be right.
It is litrally no horse cribs.
My opinion is I get it annoys YO when he goes for the fencing so i am happy to prevent that. But i dont like to completely stop him as i feel if he cant do it. It will make him worse. I compare it to a smoker or drinker..


The turnout would put me off, it is far too restricted for me. I would keep it in mind but keep on looking.

I don't know much about cribbing, is it possible to put something over the stable door that he could crib on but would protect the door? A door protector or similar?
Hi it is litrslly no cribbing..

You did say that when he was on ulcer meds from the vet his cribbing reduced dramatically, that being the case it seems to me that it's more a stomach issue than an established habit that he does regardless. Maybe the solution is to get the stomach issue sorted so he doesn't feel the need to crib as much?

At this point in time I can't help thinking that moving has to be a priority, and if that means considering a collar for a while then maybe that's something you have to accept. I would ask a yard if they'd allow you to fit a weaving grill on his door so he didn't have a surface to grip on to crib since I'd prefer that to a collar, but on the understanding that if it didn't work you would use one. And sort the gut, then he won't feel the need to crib.

I wonder if the set up you describe in this yard may suit him better? Yes turnout is restricted, but it sounds like there will always be plenty of horses in & that could be reassuring to him as it would be more like his routine back when he was in racing. I know lots of turnout is always seen as ideal, but some horses have been brought up differently from such an early age that they are almost institutionalised & feel safer being in more.
d

I also feel that it is his gut. I have spoke yo the vet regarding this and they suggested a supplement but it is expensive. I am almost tempted to así the vets to put him back on the treatment. Almost not sure if its something lile acid reflux type thing.
Sox does like a routine but even in racing he went out every day for a hour.
Why is there a rush to move? I thought that you had 2 years until the yard was sold, or is everything happening much quicker?
Yo has settled down he was reslly targetting me. However there is still a paddlock on the straw shed...
 

Mary Poppins

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#7
Everyone has ups and downs and no yard is perfect, YO's are often pretty crazy! I wouldn't go leaving unless you find somewhere you really want to go to. Can you work around the padlock? Find somewhere else to store your hay? If you are otherwise happy there it seems silly to move to somewhere where you will get an equal amount of hassle over a different topic (e.g. cribbing). If your horse cribs, he cribs. You just have to work with it and find somewhere to take him, warts and all.
 

carthorse

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Jan 6, 2006
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#8
If he improved on Gastrogard then it's ulcers, that drug doesn't work on anything else. That being the case they need treating, and maybe if you're lucky the cribbing will go then if it hasn't become a habit. Also ulcers are linked to colics & you don't need that! I know a full course at a full dose is expensive, but if he showed an improvement on a short course of a low dose then one proper course may clear them and solve a lot of problems.
 
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Jessey

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Dec 20, 2004
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#9
I wouldn't be rushing to move, it's a 'better the devil you know' situation I think, current YO has been good for so long, yes he got pissy recently but since you talked to him he's been better. The locked shed isn't a big deal if you can store your hay elsewhere.

If his cribbing reduced a lot on gastroguard then it might be time to break out the insurance, do a scope and treat properly, if his insurance would still cover that? TBH rather than throw money at supplements etc. I would probably ask how much a scope is and weigh up doing that to make sure you are only giving what he needs, even if the insurance won't cover it. How much easier would it be if you didn't have to tell every yard he's a cribber and be forced to do things to prevent him from doing it.
 

lauren123

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Feb 3, 2007
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#10
I wouldn't be rushing to move, it's a 'better the devil you know' situation I think, current YO has been good for so long, yes he got pissy recently but since you talked to him he's been better. The locked shed isn't a big deal if you can store your hay elsewhere.

If his cribbing reduced a lot on gastroguard then it might be time to break out the insurance, do a scope and treat properly, if his insurance would still cover that? TBH rather than throw money at supplements etc. I would probably ask how much a scope is and weigh up doing that to make sure you are only giving what he needs, even if the insurance won't cover it. How much easier would it be if you didn't have to tell every yard he's a cribber and be forced to do things to prevent him from doing it.
I found out this morning i have to buy my own straw now.
He was scoped when he went in for his ibd and he was clear for ulcers.
I cancelled the insurance sadly not that they would pay out anyway. I might try to persude E and are if i can put him on the full course.
 
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carthorse

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#11
If he's still clear of ulcers then Gastrogard is a waste of money, and a lot of money at that. Get him tested again before going down that route, if you don't want an intrusive scope then look at the Succeed faecal test instead. It might be worth looking at Succeed anyway if he tests clear, it's meant to help the whole digestive tract so could be useful for someone like Sox.